Omar Suleiman: CIA’s butcher Resume

This can only happen in Egypt: The people revolt, and overthrow a tyrant regime, and in the first post revolution presidential elections, one of the old regime’s most brutal and clandestine strongmen run for president!

Omar Suleiman, former Egyptian army general, and head of intelligence services, announced he is running for president in the post revolution presidential elections of 2012. Ironically he did that on the 6th of April, a date the marks the anniversary of the 2008 Egyptian general strike, which a lot perceive as one of the lead ups to the 25th of Jan revolution.

Suleiman in the official speech declaring his candidacy Suleiman, claimed that he was pressured into running by his supporters and that he accepted to “Protect the Revolution”! The Nerve on this guy! He really is shameless!!!

Suleiman seems to forget his own statements a year and 2 months back, when he as a VP was claiming that the revolution was because of “foreign influence” and was asserting that the Egyptians were not ready for democracy yet!

Suleiman actually went ahead with it and today he formally filed his presidential candidacy application with the Supreme Presidential Electoral Commission (SPEC). Another Ironic coincidence is that today the 8th of April coincides with the memory of the tragic bombing of Bahr El-Baqar primary school in 1970, by no other than Suleiman’s close friends, the IDF, another telling coincidence I guess!

But for all those who don’t believe in Signs & coincidences, here is an introduction to the butcher to awaken the Sadomasochistic slavery addicts who want to elect this monster, those who would trade off freedom with shackles & oppression under the fake illusion of security and safety…

Omar Suleiman: The Biography of a Butcher:

Omar Suleiman is a former Egyptian army general who joined the military intelligence, there he worked chiefly on Egypt-United States relations.

Suleiman became director of military intelligence in 1991, and in 1993, he became the chief of the Egyptian General Intelligence Service (EGIS).

Career as Egyptian General Intelligence Service (EGIS):

Role in Gaza Strife and Seige:

Suleiman promised Israel in 2005 that he would prevent Hamas from gaining control over Gaza in the 2006 Palestinian elections, according to a US diplomatic cable. Amos Gilad, head of the Israeli Defense Ministry’s Diplomatic-Security Bureau, and Suleiman discussed their common fear of Hamas winning the Palestinian elections set for January 2006. Suleiman asserted to Gilad that there “will be no elections in January. We will take care of it.” Suleiman did not elaborate as to how Egypt would stop the Palestinian elections from taking place.

In another leaked cable, Suleiman was quoted as saying Gaza could “go hungry, but not starve.” The same cable notes that a hot-line set up between Israel’s Defense Ministry and the Suleiman-led Egyptian General Intelligence Service was in “daily use.” The leaked cable reveals that Suleiman — angry at Israeli criticism of Egypt’s ineffectiveness in stopping arms-smuggling to Gaza — suggested that Israel send troops to Egypt’s Philadelphi Corridor and stop it themselves.

In 2007, Suleiman pledged to Yuval Diskin of the Israeli Security Agency (ISA) to “cleanse” Sinai of Palestinian arms smugglers.

And again on the New Year’s Eve of 2008, Suleiman promised US more pressure on Hamas, already under siege by then. In that New Year’s Eve Suleiman said: “Egypt would keep pressure on Hamas but will maintain “low-level” contacts with Hamas. Egypt, he said, wants Hamas isolated.” Suleiman applauded the US efforts in that respect.

Suleiman led off the New Year’s Eve meeting by telling the US officials that Egypt is America’s partner and that teh government of Egypt will continue to provide the USG with its knowledge and expertise on the critical regional issues, such as Lebanon and Iraq.

It is no surprise that Israel would announce proudly that it backs Suleiman as a possible President of Egypt, from as early as 2008.

Suleiman also played a key role in the Egyptian-negotiated indirect talks between Israel and Hamas over the past two years, paying official visits to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, where he met with Israeli leaders including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Shimon Peres.

But most appealing for the US has been Suleiman’s reputation as an ardent anti-Islamist with a visceral dislike of the Muslim Brotherhood. According to British daily The Guardian, Suleiman has in the past described the Brotherhood as “liars who only understand force”.

CIA “rendition” program & Suleiman’s role in aiding the US in the Iraq invasion:

CIA illegal rendition flights

The So-called "rendition" illegal flights of the CIA. Torture victims and human rights groups assert Suleiman oversaw the systematic use of torture on detainees and personally tortured a detainee in controversial CIA renditions

Suleiman was directly implicated in the controversial CIA “rendition” program. Journalist Stephen Grey in his work, Ghost Plane, states that after taking over as intelligence director, Suleiman oversaw an agreement with the US in 1995 that allowed for suspected militants to be secretly transferred to Egypt for questioning.

In the mid-1990s, Suleiman worked closely with the Clinton administration in devising and implementing its rendition program; back then, rendition involved kidnapping suspected terrorists and transferring them to a third country for trial. In The Dark Side, Jane Mayer describes how the rendition program began:

“Each rendition was authorised at the very top levels of both governments [the US and Egypt] … The long-serving chief of the Egyptian central intelligence agency, Omar Suleiman, negotiated directly with top [CIA] officials. [Former US Ambassador to Egypt Edward] Walker described the Egyptian counterpart, Suleiman, as ‘very bright, very realistic’, adding that he was cognisant that there was a downside to ‘some of the negative things that the Egyptians engaged in, of torture and so on. But he was not squeamish, by the way’. (p. 113).

“Technically, US law required the CIA to seek ‘assurances’ from Egypt that rendered suspects wouldn’t face torture. But under Suleiman’s reign at the EGIS, such assurances were considered close to worthless. As Michael Scheuer, a former CIA officer [head of the al-Qaeda desk], who helped set up the practise of rendition, later testified, even if such ‘assurances’ were written in indelible ink, ‘they weren’t worth a bucket of warm spit’.”

Under the Bush administration, in the context of “the global war on terror”, US renditions became “extraordinary”, meaning the objective of kidnapping and extra-legal transfer was no longer to bring a suspect to trial – but rather for interrogation to seek actionable intelligence. The extraordinary rendition program landed some people in CIA black sites – and others were turned over for torture-by-proxy to other regimes. Egypt figured large as a torture destination of choice, as did Suleiman as Egypt’s torturer-in-chief. At least one person extraordinarily rendered by the CIA to Egypt — Egyptian-born Australian citizen Mamdouh Habib — was reportedly tortured by Suleiman himself.

Suleiman was accused of complicity in the torture of Al-Qaeda suspects in Egypt, particularly the case of Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi, who was captured and handed over to Suleiman. The information al-Libi gave under torture was cited by US officials in the run-up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq as evidence of a connection between Saddam Hussein and al-Qaeda. Al-Libi later retracted his confession.

Mamdouh Habib Torture Case:

In October 2001, Mamdouh Habib was seized from a bus by Pakistani security forces. While detained in Pakistan, at the behest of American agents, he was suspended from a hook and electrocuted repeatedly. He was then turned over to the CIA, and in the process of transporting him to Egypt he endured the usual treatment: his clothes were cut off, a suppository was stuffed in his anus, he was put into a diaper – and ‘wrapped up like a spring roll’.

In Egypt, as Habib recounts in his memoir, My Story: The Tale of a Terrorist Who Wasn’t, he was repeatedly subjected to electric shocks, immersed in water up to his nostrils and beaten. His fingers were broken and he was hung from metal hooks. At one point, his interrogator slapped him so hard that his blindfold was dislodged, revealing the identity of his tormentor: Suleiman.

Frustrated that Habib was not providing useful information or confessing to involvement in terrorism, Suleiman ordered a guard to murder a shackled prisoner in front of Habib, which he did with a vicious karate kick. In April 2002, after five months in Egypt, Habib was rendered to American custody at Bagram prison in Afghanistan – and then transported to Guantanamo. On January 11, 2005, the day before he was scheduled to be charged, Dana Priest of the Washington Post published an exposé about Habib’s torture. The US government immediately announced that he would not be charged and would be repatriated to Australia.

Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi Torture Case:

A far more infamous torture case, in which Suleiman also is directly implicated, is that of Ibn al-Sheikh al-Libi. Unlike Habib, who was innocent of any ties to terror or militancy, al-Libi was allegedly a trainer at al-Khaldan camp in Afghanistan. He was captured by the Pakistanis while fleeing across the border in November 2001. He was sent to Bagram, and questioned by the FBI. But the CIA wanted to take over, which they did, and he was transported to a black site on the USS Bataan in the Arabian Sea, then extraordinarily rendered to Egypt. Under torture there, al-Libi “confessed” knowledge about an al-Qaeda–Saddam connection, claiming that two al-Qaeda operatives had received training in Iraq for use in chemical and biological weapons. In early 2003, this was exactly the kind of information that the Bush administration was seeking to justify attacking Iraq and to persuade reluctant allies to go along. Indeed, al-Libi’s “confession” was one the central pieces of “evidence” presented at the United Nations by then-Secretary of State Colin Powell to make the case for war.

As it turns out, that confession was a lie tortured out of him by Egyptians. Here is how former CIA chief George Tenet describes the whole al-Libi situation in his 2007 memoir, At The Center Of The Storm:

“We believed that al-Libi was withholding critical threat information at the time, so we transferred him to a third country for further debriefing. Allegations were made that we did so knowing that he would be tortured, but this is false. The country in question [Egypt] understood and agreed that they would hold al-Libi for a limited period. In the course of questioning while he was in US custody in Afghanistan, al-Libi made initial references to possible al-Qa’ida training in Iraq. He offered up information that a militant known as Abu Abdullah had told him that at least three times between 1997 and 2000, the now-deceased al-Qa’ida leader Mohammad Atef had sent Abu Abdullah to Iraq to seek training in poisons and mustard gas.

“Another senior al-Qa’ida detainee told us that Mohammad Atef was interested in expanding al-Qa’ida’s ties to Iraq, which, in our eyes, added credibility to the reporting. Then, shortly after the Iraq war got under way, al-Libi recanted his story. Now, suddenly, he was saying that there was no such cooperative training. Inside the CIA, there was sharp division on his recantation. It led us to recall his reporting, and here is where the mystery begins.

“Al-Libi’s story will no doubt be that he decided to fabricate in order to get better treatment and avoid harsh punishment. He clearly lied. We just don’t know when. Did he lie when he first said that al-Qa’ida members received training in Iraq – or did he lie when he said they did not? In my mind, either case might still be true. Perhaps, early on, he was under pressure, assumed his interrogators already knew the story, and sang away. After time passed and it became clear that he would not be harmed, he might have changed his story to cloud the minds of his captors. Al-Qa’ida operatives are trained to do just that. A recantation would restore his stature as someone who had successfully confounded the enemy. The fact is, we don’t know which story is true, and since we don’t know, we can assume nothing. (pp. 353-354)”

Al-Libi was eventually sent off, quietly, to Libya – though he reportedly made a few other stops along the way – where he was imprisoned. The use of al-Libi’s statement in the build-up to the Iraq war made him a huge American liability once it became clear that the purported al-Qaeda–Saddam connection was a tortured lie. His whereabouts were, in fact, a secret for years, until April 2009 when Human Rights Watch researchers investigating the treatment of Libyan prisoners encountered him in the courtyard of a prison. Two weeks later, on May 10, al-Libi was dead, and the Gaddafi regime claimed it was a suicide.

According to Evan Kohlmann, who enjoys favored status among US officials as an ‘al-Qaeda expert’, citing a classified source: ‘Al-Libi’s death coincided with the first visit by Egypt’s spymaster Omar Suleiman to Tripoli.’

Kohlmann surmises and opines that, after al-Libi recounted his story about about an al-Qaeda–Saddam-WMD connection, “The Egyptians were embarrassed by this admission – and the Bush government found itself in hot water internationally. Then, in May 2009, Omar Suleiman saw an opportunity to get even with al-Libi and traveled to Tripoli. By the time Omar Suleiman’s plane left Tripoli, Ibn al-Sheikh al-Libi had committed ‘suicide’.”

This is the man now hailed by some as Egypt’s only hope of getting rid of the Islamist parties! Those who believe so are doing exactly what he foresaw, proving that we are not ready for democracy! The question they must ask themselves is after Suleiman is done with the Muslim Brotherhood, who’s turn will it be? the revolutionaries? the liberals? the dissents? or the entire population?
Only among the Egyptians, will such an autocrat actually gain supporters! It appears that we really have a high percentage of Sadomasochistic slavery addicts among the population!

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Sources:

Wikipedia
ABC news
Al Jazeera
New Yorker
Washington Post

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